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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2011, Article ID 102431, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/102431
Review Article

Resveratrol, MicroRNAs, Inflammation, and Cancer

1Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics, Ohio State University, Biomedical Research Tower, 460 W 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2LBMN-INSERM U866, Université de Bourgogne, Faculté Gabriel, 6 boulevard Gabriel, 21000 Dijon, France

Received 20 October 2010; Revised 15 June 2011; Accepted 22 June 2011

Academic Editor: Dmitry A. Stetsenko

Copyright © 2011 Esmerina Tili and Jean-Jacques Michaille. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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