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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2014, Article ID 102968, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/102968
Research Article

In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

1Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, 1 Medical Center Drive, P.O. Box 9530, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
2Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Pharmacology & Chemistry Program, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA
3Department of Chemistry, West Virginia University, 217 Clark Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA

Received 3 August 2014; Revised 14 September 2014; Accepted 14 September 2014; Published 23 October 2014

Academic Editor: Ben Berkhout

Copyright © 2014 Ryan M. Williams et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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