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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2016, Article ID 8235121, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8235121
Review Article

Role of Eukaryotic Initiation Factors during Cellular Stress and Cancer Progression

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Alberta RNA Research and Training Institute, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada T1K 3M4

Received 30 October 2016; Accepted 14 November 2016

Academic Editor: Hyouta Himeno

Copyright © 2016 Divya Khandige Sharma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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