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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6439169, 20 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6439169
Review Article

Physiological Roles of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0SP, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Syed O. Ali; ku.ca.mac@22aos

Received 8 July 2017; Accepted 24 September 2017; Published 18 October 2017

Academic Editor: Shigenori Iwai

Copyright © 2017 Farhaan A. Khan and Syed O. Ali. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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