Table of Contents
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Volume 2013, Article ID 879710, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/879710
Research Article

Immunolocalization of Kisspeptin Associated with Amyloid-β Deposits in the Pons of an Alzheimer’s Disease Patient

1Department of Human and Health Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 6UW, UK
2Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Roehampton, Holybourne Avenue, London SW15 4JD, UK

Received 3 February 2013; Revised 23 April 2013; Accepted 24 April 2013

Academic Editor: Gal Bitan

Copyright © 2013 Amrutha Chilumuri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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