Table of Contents
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 242505, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/242505
Research Article

Antiamnesic Effects of a Hydroethanolic Extract of Crinum macowanii on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

1Drug and Toxicology Information Service (DaTIS), School of Pharmacy and Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, P.O. Box A 178, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe
2Department of Preclinical Veterinary Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, P.O. Box MP, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe

Received 1 June 2015; Revised 31 August 2015; Accepted 16 September 2015

Academic Editor: Nicola Simola

Copyright © 2015 Andrew T. Mugwagwa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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