Table of Contents
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Volume 2015, Article ID 313702, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/313702
Research Article

Valproic Acid Neuroprotection in the 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson’s Disease Is Possibly Related to Its Anti-Inflammatory and HDAC Inhibitory Properties

1Faculty of Medicine Estácio of Juazeiro do Norte, Avenida Tenente Raimundo Rocha 515, 63048-080 Juazeiro do Norte, CE, Brazil
2Faculty of Medicine of the Federal University of Ceará, Rua Coronel Nunes de Melo 1127, 60430-270 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
3School of Medicine of the Federal University of São Paulo, Rua Botucatu 862, 04023-900 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 19 November 2014; Revised 8 January 2015; Accepted 11 January 2015

Academic Editor: Barbara Picconi

Copyright © 2015 José Christian Machado Ximenes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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