Table of Contents
Journal of Oral Diseases
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 383746, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/383746
Research Article

Effect of Scaling and Root Planing on Detection of Tannerella forsythia in Chronic Periodontitis

1Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Saraswati Dhanwantari Dental College and Hospital, Pathri Road, NH 222, Parbhani, Maharashtra 431401, India
2Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Sawangi, Wardha 442001, India
3Department of Dentistry, Government Medical College, Latur 413512, India
4Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Maitri Dental College, Durg 491001, India

Received 29 August 2013; Revised 6 November 2013; Accepted 28 November 2013

Academic Editor: Atsutoshi Yoshimura

Copyright © 2013 Ritesh B. Wadhwani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aim. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of Tannerella forsythia in subgingival plaque samples of chronic periodontitis patients having different level of periodontal destruction and to assess the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP) on prevalence of T. forsythia. Materials and Methods. Study included 3 groups: group 1 were healthy individuals, group 2 had periodontitis with probing depth ≤ 5 mm, and group 3 had periodontitis with probing depth > 5 mm. Subjects in groups 2 and 3 exhibited both healthy and diseased periodontal sites. Prevalence of T. forsythia was determined using polymerase chain reaction. Subjects in groups 2 and 3 received SRP and were reevaluated three months after SRP. Results. T. forsythia was not detected in group 1. It was found in diseased sites in 40% and 73.33% of patients from groups 2 and 3, respectively. It was also found in healthy sites in 6.67% and 13.33% of patients from groups 2 and 3, respectively. The detection frequency of T. forsythia after SRP was 6.67% and 13.33% in groups 2 and 3, respectively. Conclusion. The results indicate a possible association between periodontal disease and presence of T. forsythia. Also, the detection frequency of T. forsythia was reduced after SRP.