Table of Contents
Journal of Petroleum Engineering
Volume 2014, Article ID 961641, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/961641
Research Article

Geomechanical Properties of Unconventional Shale Reservoirs

1Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
2Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
3Occidental Petroleum Corporation, Bakersfield, CA 93311, USA

Received 12 July 2014; Accepted 12 October 2014; Published 3 December 2014

Academic Editor: Andrea Franzetti

Copyright © 2014 Mohammad O. Eshkalak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Production from unconventional reservoirs has gained an increased attention among operators in North America during past years and is believed to secure the energy demand for next decades. Economic production from unconventional reservoirs is mainly attributed to realizing the complexities and key fundamentals of reservoir formation properties. Geomechanical well logs (including well logs such as total minimum horizontal stress, Poisson’s ratio, and Young, shear, and bulk modulus) are secured source to obtain these substantial shale rock properties. However, running these geomechanical well logs for the entire asset is not a common practice that is associated with the cost of obtaining these well logs. In this study, synthetic geomechanical well logs for a Marcellus shale asset located in southern Pennsylvania are generated using data-driven modeling. Full-field geomechanical distributions (map and volumes) of this asset for five geomechanical properties are also created using general geostatistical methods coupled with data-driven modeling. The results showed that synthetic geomechanical well logs and real field logs fall into each other when the input dataset has not seen the real field well logs. Geomechanical distributions of the Marcellus shale improved significantly when full-field data is incorporated in the geostatistical calculations.