Table of Contents
Journal of Quality and Reliability Engineering
Volume 2013, Article ID 532350, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/532350
Research Article

A Heuristic Methodology for Efficient Reduction of Large Multistate Event Trees

System Reliability and Industrial Safety Laboratory, National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, P.O. Box 60228, Agia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens, Greece

Received 31 May 2012; Revised 22 August 2012; Accepted 26 September 2012

Academic Editor: Nikolaos E. Limnios

Copyright © 2013 Eftychia C. Marcoulaki. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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