Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2011, Article ID 195239, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/195239
Review Article

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-2 (PTPN11) in Hematopoiesis and Leukemogenesis

Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

Received 16 February 2011; Accepted 1 April 2011

Academic Editor: David Leitenberg

Copyright © 2011 Xia Liu and Cheng-Kui Qu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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