Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 742372, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/742372
Review Article

Regulation of Ack-Family Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinases

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Basic Science Tower T5, Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA

Received 30 November 2010; Accepted 13 January 2011

Academic Editor: Yasuo Fukami

Copyright © 2011 Victoria Prieto-Echagüe and W. Todd Miller. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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