Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 865819, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/865819
Review Article

Regulation of Src Family Kinases in Human Cancers

1Department of Thoracic/Head & Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 15 December 2010; Accepted 8 February 2011

Academic Editor: Yasuo Fukami

Copyright © 2011 Banibrata Sen and Faye M. Johnson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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