Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2011, Article ID 894351, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/894351
Review Article

Tyrosine Phosphorylation-Mediated Signaling Pathways in Dictyostelium

Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA

Received 27 December 2010; Accepted 21 February 2011

Academic Editor: J. Adolfo García-Sáinz

Copyright © 2011 Tong Sun and Leung Kim. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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