Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 930940, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/930940
Review Article

The Dynamical Systems Properties of the HOG Signaling Cascade

1Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, UMR7057, CNRS and Université Paris Diderot, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75013 Paris, France
2Contraintes Research Group, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, INRIA Paris—Rocquencourt, France
3Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
4The Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411, Singapore

Received 14 August 2010; Revised 19 October 2010; Accepted 12 November 2010

Academic Editor: Johannes Boonstra

Copyright © 2011 Agnès Miermont et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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