Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 421564, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/421564
Review Article

Expression and Role of the Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel KCa3.1 in Glioblastoma

Dipartimento di Biologia Cellulare e Ambientale, Universita’ di Perugia, Via Pascoli 1, I-06123 Perugia, Italy

Received 5 February 2012; Accepted 15 March 2012

Academic Editor: Laura Cerchia

Copyright © 2012 Luigi Catacuzzeno et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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