Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 931215, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/931215
Review Article

The Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of Mitochondrial Proteins in Stress Responses

1Laboratory of Cell Signaling, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
2Division of Cell Regulation, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521, Japan
3Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan

Received 22 April 2012; Accepted 10 June 2012

Academic Editor: Rudi Beyaert

Copyright © 2012 Yusuke Kanamaru et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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