Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 731350, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/731350
Review Article

Signaling Pathways Involved in Renal Oxidative Injury: Role of the Vasoactive Peptides and the Renal Dopaminergic System

Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, CONICET, INFIBIOC, 1113 Buenos Aires, Argentina

Received 30 June 2014; Accepted 16 October 2014; Published 11 November 2014

Academic Editor: Jia L. Zhuo

Copyright © 2014 N. L. Rukavina Mikusic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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