Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2014, Article ID 970346, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/970346
Research Article

TGF-β Signaling Cooperates with AT Motif-Binding Factor-1 for Repression of the α-Fetoprotein Promoter

1Laboratory of Biochemistry, Showa Pharmaceutical University, 3-3165 Higashi-Tamagawagakuen, Machida, Tokyo 194-8543, Japan
2Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya 467-8601, Japan
3Department of Medical Management & Information, Hokkaido Information University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8585, Japan
4Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N1

Received 18 April 2014; Accepted 23 May 2014; Published 3 July 2014

Academic Editor: Shoukat Dedhar

Copyright © 2014 Nobuo Sakata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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