Table of Contents
Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume 2014, Article ID 916597, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/916597
Research Article

Trichomonas vaginalis Incidence Associated with Hormonal Contraceptive Use and HIV Infection among Women in Rakai, Uganda

1Department of Population, Reproductive and Family Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, E4010, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
2Rakai Health Science Program, P.O. Box 279, Kalisizo, Uganda
3Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Makerere University, School of Public Health, New Mulago Hospital Complex, Maksph Building, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda
4Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA

Received 4 November 2013; Revised 28 January 2014; Accepted 28 January 2014; Published 4 March 2014

Academic Editor: Cecile L. Tremblay

Copyright © 2014 Heena Brahmbhatt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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