Table of Contents
Journal of Viruses
Volume 2014, Article ID 382539, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/382539
Review Article

Bacteriophages and Their Derivatives as Biotherapeutic Agents in Disease Prevention and Treatment

1Department of Biological Sciences, Cork Institute of Technology, Bishopstown, Cork, Ireland
2Biotechnology Department, Teagasc, Moorepark Food Research Centre, Fermoy, Co. Cork, Ireland
3Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College, Cork, Ireland
4Department of Microbiology, University College, Cork, Ireland

Received 25 October 2013; Accepted 4 December 2013; Published 26 March 2014

Academic Editor: Yves Mely

Copyright © 2014 Mohamed Elbreki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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