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Journal of Veterinary Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 3102567, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3102567
Research Article

Subcutaneous Implants of a Cholesterol-Triglyceride-Buprenorphine Suspension in Rats

1Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Baltimore, MD, USA
2Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Baltimore, MD, USA
3George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA
4University of Maryland School of Medicine, Departments of Pathology, Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health and the Program of Comparative Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to M. Guarnieri; ten.tsacmoc@ireinraugm

Received 14 January 2017; Revised 18 March 2017; Accepted 21 March 2017; Published 9 April 2017

Academic Editor: Vito Laudadio

Copyright © 2017 M. Guarnieri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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