Table of Contents
Lung Cancer International
Volume 2014, Article ID 721087, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/721087
Review Article

Alveolar Macrophage Polarisation in Lung Cancer

1Cancer & Tissue Repair Laboratory, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia
2Applied Medical Sciences College, Qassim University, Buraidah 51452, Saudi Arabia
3Institute for Breathing & Sleep, Austin Health, Heidelberg, VIC 3084, Australia
4School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, P.O. Box 71, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia

Received 18 February 2014; Accepted 11 April 2014; Published 8 May 2014

Academic Editor: Kosei Yasumoto

Copyright © 2014 Saleh A. Almatroodi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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