Table of Contents
Leukemia Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 976567, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/976567
Review Article

Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Multiple Myeloma

Cancer Biology Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 4511 Forest Park Avenue, Room 3103, Saint Louis, MO 63108, USA

Received 4 March 2014; Revised 4 April 2014; Accepted 5 April 2014; Published 16 April 2014

Academic Editor: Massimo Breccia

Copyright © 2014 Pilar de la Puente et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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