Table of Contents
Leukemia Research and Treatment
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 757694, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/757694
Review Article

Hsp90 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry 605014, India

Received 26 August 2015; Revised 11 November 2015; Accepted 12 November 2015

Academic Editor: Massimo Breccia

Copyright © 2015 Kalubai Vari Khajapeer and Rajasekaran Baskaran. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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