Table of Contents
Metal-Based Drugs
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 260146, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/260146
Review Article

Arsenic-Based Antineoplastic Drugs and Their Mechanisms of Action

School of Medical Sciences, Griffith University, Parklands Drive, Southport, Queensland 4215, Australia

Received 1 April 2007; Revised 3 July 2007; Accepted 17 August 2007

Academic Editor: Rafael Moreno-Sanchez

Copyright © 2008 Stephen John Ralph. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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