Table of Contents
Metal-Based Drugs
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 276109, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/276109
Review Article

Photodynamic Therapy and the Development of Metal-Based Photosensitisers

Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull, Kingston-upon-Hull HU6 7RX, UK

Received 11 September 2007; Accepted 30 October 2007

Academic Editor: Michael J. Cook

Copyright © 2008 Leanne B. Josefsen and Ross W. Boyle. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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