Table of Contents
Metal-Based Drugs
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 716329, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/716329
Review Article

Proteomic Approaches in Understanding Action Mechanisms of Metal-Based Anticancer Drugs

Department of Anatomy, The University of Hong Kong, PokFuLam Road, Hong Kong SAR, China

Received 19 November 2007; Revised 20 April 2008; Accepted 17 June 2008

Academic Editor: Rafael Moreno-Sanchez

Copyright © 2008 Ying Wang and Jen-Fu Chiu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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