Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2011, Article ID 137459, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/137459
Review Article

Protein Methylation and Stress Granules: Posttranslational Remodeler or Innocent Bystander?

1Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 1065, USA
2Biochemical Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Molecular Biology, New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, 1050 Forest Hill Road, Staten Island, NY 10314, USA

Received 30 November 2010; Accepted 10 January 2011

Academic Editor: Jörg Kobarg

Copyright © 2011 Wen Xie and Robert B. Denman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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