Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2012, Article ID 580965, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/580965
Research Article

Three-Dimensional Molecular Modeling of a Diverse Range of SC Clan Serine Proteases

1Infectious Diseases and Immunology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, West Bengal, Kolkata 700032, India
2Department of Pathology, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, P.O. Box 913, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
3National Research Centre for Growth and Development, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand

Received 25 July 2012; Revised 17 October 2012; Accepted 17 October 2012

Academic Editor: Alessandro Desideri

Copyright © 2012 Aparna Laskar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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