Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 586401, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/586401
Review Article

HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Still Remains a New Drug Target: Structure, Function, Classical Inhibitors, and New Inhibitors with Innovative Mechanisms of Actions

Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, SS 554, 09042 Monserrato, Italy

Received 17 January 2012; Accepted 3 April 2012

Academic Editor: Gilda Tachedjian

Copyright © 2012 Francesca Esposito et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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