Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 974324, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/974324
Review Article

The Transcriptomics of Secondary Growth and Wood Formation in Conifers

1Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Genomics and Biotechnology (IBB/CGB), University of Tras-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
2Instituto de Investigação Científica Tropical (IICT), Centro de Florestas e Produtos Florestais (FLOR), Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa, Portugal
3Department of Forestry Sciences and Landscape (CIFAP), University of Tras-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
4Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences (CITAB), University of Tras-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal

Received 29 April 2013; Revised 22 August 2013; Accepted 9 September 2013

Academic Editor: Joseph Rothnagel

Copyright © 2013 Ana Carvalho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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