SRX Medicine

SRX Medicine / 2010 / Article

Clinical Study | Open Access

Volume 2010 |Article ID 973413 | 5 pages | https://doi.org/10.3814/2010/973413

Long-Term Effect of Colestimide on Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Elevated Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels

Received12 Oct 2009
Revised24 Oct 2009
Accepted25 Oct 2009
Published13 Jan 2010

Abstract

Objective. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) have been shown to improve both low-density lipoprotein-(LDL-) cholesterol and hemoglobin (Hb) A1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes with elevated LDL levels. However, the longitudinal effect on glycemic control in these patients has not been fully examined. In the current study, the effect of colestimide (a BAS used in Japan, called also as colestilan) over a mean period of 18 months was investigated in patients with type 2 diabetes with elevated LDL levels. Methods. The study was performed prospectively in 34 patients with type 2 diabetes with elevated LDL levels who started colestimide (3.0 g a day) between April 2007 and March 2008. Results. HbA1c was significantly decreased after 3 months of colestimide therapy and at the end point of treatment (a mean period of 18 months) compared with baseline values (8.1%±1.1% at baseline, 7.1%±0.7% at 3 months, and 7.2%±0.9% at the end point; both P<.0001 versus baseline; P>.05, 3 months versus end point). Colestimide also significantly reduced LDL-C at 3 months and at the end point (both P<.0001 versus baseline; P>.05, 3 months versus end point). However, fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and body weight did not differ significantly after 3 months and at the end point compared with the respective baseline values. Conclusion. Colestimide significantly decreased HbA1c over a relatively long-term period in patients with type 2 diabetes with elevated LDL levels.

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Copyright © 2010 Kohzo Takebayashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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