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Malaria Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 217276, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/217276
Research Article

Media, Health Workers, and Policy Makers' Relationship and Their Impact on Antimalarial Policy Adoption: A Population Genetics Perspective

1Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P.O. Box 3038, Morogoro, Tanzania
2Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), Research and Development Center (RDC), P.O. Box 53, Ifakara, Kilombero District, Tanzania
3London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Pathogen Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Infectious Tropical Diseases, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK
4Department of Veterinary Physiology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P.O. Box 3017, Morogoro, Tanzania
5Malaria Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA 30341, USA

Received 22 January 2011; Revised 19 April 2011; Accepted 26 April 2011

Academic Editor: Paul Wenzel Geissler

Copyright © 2011 Allen Malisa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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