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Malaria Research and Treatment
Volume 2018, Article ID 4914358, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4914358
Research Article

Evaluation of Routine Microscopy Performance for Malaria Diagnosis at Three Different Health Centers in Brazzaville, Republic of Congo

1Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Marien Ngouabi, BP 69 Brazzaville, Congo
2Laboratoire National de Santé Publique, BP 120 Brazzaville, Congo
3Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université Marien Ngouabi, BP 69 Brazzaville, Congo
4Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Brazzaville, BP 1846, Congo

Correspondence should be addressed to Pembe Issamou Mayengue; rf.oohay@eugneyamp

Received 10 March 2018; Accepted 25 July 2018; Published 2 September 2018

Academic Editor: Liwang Cui

Copyright © 2018 Pembe Issamou Mayengue et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. In Republic of Congo, malaria diagnosis still widely relies on microscopy. We aimed to evaluate the performance of routine microscopy for malaria diagnosis at three different health centers in Brazzaville. Methods. A total of 259, 416, and 131 patients with clinical signs of uncomplicated malaria were enrolled at the Hôpital de Mfilou, Centre de Santé Intégré “Maman Mboualé,” and Laboratoire National de Santé Publique, respectively. Two thick blood smears were prepared for each patient, the first being examined by routine microscopists and the second by expert. Results. At the Hôpital de Mfilou, sensitivity was 62.1% and specificity was 67.3%. Positive and negative predictive values were 55.6% and 72.9%, respectively. At the Centre de Santé Intégré “Maman Mboualé,” sensitivity was 94.2% and specificity was 33.6%. Positive and negative predictive values were 50% and 89.1%, respectively. At the Laboratoire National de Santé Publique, sensitivity and specificity were high with 91.7% and 94.9%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 64.7% and 99.1%, respectively. Conclusion. The performance of routine malaria microscopy in Brazzaville remains inaccurate with large variations among different health centers. Therefore, repeated training including supervision and evaluation would improve routine malaria diagnosis for better management of malaria in Brazzaville, the Republic of Congo.