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Neuroscience Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 201909, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/201909
Research Article

Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

1Farmacología Conductual, Dirección de Investigaciones en Neurociencias, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz, 14370 México City, DF, Mexico
2Departamento de Farmacobiología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, 14330 México City, DF, Mexico

Received 26 September 2013; Accepted 23 November 2013

Academic Editor: Pasquale Striano

Copyright © 2013 José Jaime Herrera-Pérez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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