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Neuroscience Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 736439, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/736439
Research Article

The mGlu2/3 Receptor Agonists LY354740 and LY379268 Differentially Regulate Restraint-Stress-Induced Expression of c-Fos in Rat Cerebral Cortex

1Neuroscience Discovery, Eli Lilly & Company, Indianapolis, IN 46285, USA
2Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
3Abbott Laboratories, Global Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Neuroscience Clinical Development, Abbott Park, IL 60064-6075, USA

Received 11 June 2013; Accepted 27 September 2013

Academic Editor: Dong-ho Youn

Copyright © 2013 M. M. Menezes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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