Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Neuroscience Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 368989, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/368989
Research Article

Change in Motor and Nonmotor Symptoms Severity in a “Real-Life” Cohort of Subjects with Parkinson’s Disease

1Clinical Neurodegenerative Research Unit, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 3877 Insurgentes Sur, Tlalpan, 14269 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
2Movement Disorder Clinic, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 3877 Insurgentes Sur, Tlalpan, 14269 Mexico City, DF, Mexico

Received 3 June 2015; Accepted 16 August 2015

Academic Editor: Pasquale Striano

Copyright © 2015 Adib Jorge de Saráchaga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive disorder. Rates of change in motor symptoms have been more studied compared to nonmotor symptoms. The objective was to describe these changes in a real-life cohort of subjects with PD. Methods. A cohort study was carried out from 2011 to 2013. Consecutive patients with PD were recruited from a movement disorders clinic. MDS-UPDRS, PDQ-8, and NMSS were applied to all subjects at an initial evaluation and a subsequent visit ( months). Disease severity was categorized using a recent classification of MDS-UPDRS severity. Results. The MDS-UPDRS Part III showed a significant decrease of points () between evaluations. A mean increase of points () in the MDS-UPDRS Part IV was observed. An increase of points () in the NMSS total score was found; when assessed individually, the difference was statistically significant only for the perceptual problems/hallucinations item. Quality of life remained unchanged. Conclusion. Motor improvement was observed accompanied by an increase in motor complications possibly as a result of treatment optimization. Nonmotor symptoms worsened as a whole. The overall effect in the quality of life was negligible.