Table of Contents Author Guidelines
Neuroscience Journal
Volume 2019, Article ID 8363274, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/8363274
Research Article

Modulation of Phospho-CREB by Systemically Administered Recombinant BDNF in the Hippocampus of the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

1IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Laboratory of Neuroanatomy, Rome, Italy
2Catholic University of Rome Department of Anatomy, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Francesca R. Fusco; ti.aiculatnash@ocsuf.f

Received 19 July 2018; Revised 2 November 2018; Accepted 13 December 2018; Published 6 February 2019

Academic Editor: Michael Ryan Hunsaker

Copyright © 2019 Emanuela Paldino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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