Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 237431, 26 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/237431
Review Article

Biology of the KCNQ1 Potassium Channel

Bioelectricity Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of California, 360 Med Surge II, Irivine, CA 92697, USA

Received 5 September 2013; Accepted 22 November 2013; Published 29 January 2014

Academic Editor: Lydie Combaret

Copyright © 2014 Geoffrey W. Abbott. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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