Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 271940, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/271940
Review Article

Macrophages, Neutrophils, and Cancer: A Double Edged Sword

1Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, 20089 Rozzano, Italy
2Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan, 20089 Rozzano, Italy

Received 6 March 2014; Accepted 20 May 2014; Published 13 August 2014

Academic Editor: Marco E. M. Peluso

Copyright © 2014 Alberto Mantovani. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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