Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 745808, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/745808
Review Article

Advances and Prospects in Cancer Immunotherapy

Institute for Tumor Immunology, Ludong University School of Life Sciences, 186 Hongqi Middle Road, Yantai, Shandong 264025, China

Received 9 December 2013; Accepted 11 February 2014; Published 13 March 2014

Academic Editor: Jordi Camps

Copyright © 2014 Juhua Zhou. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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