Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 757534, 27 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/757534
Review Article

Mammalian MYC Proteins and Cancer

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 465 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37232, USA

Received 29 August 2013; Accepted 1 November 2013; Published 2 February 2014

Academic Editor: Ygal Haupt

Copyright © 2014 William P. Tansey. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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