Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 815102, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/815102
Review Article

Between Amyloids and Aggregation Lies a Connection with Strength and Adhesion

1Biology Department, Brooklyn College, The City University of New York, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210, USA
2The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, New York, NY 10016, USA
3Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA

Received 10 October 2013; Accepted 12 December 2013; Published 2 February 2014

Academic Editor: Yuri L. Lyubchenko

Copyright © 2014 Peter N. Lipke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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