Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 873084, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/873084
Review Article

Insights from a Paradigm Shift: How the Poly(A)-Binding Protein Brings Translating mRNAs Full Circle

Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0129, USA

Received 18 May 2014; Accepted 5 July 2014; Published 18 August 2014

Academic Editor: Yuri L. Lyubchenko

Copyright © 2014 Daniel R. Gallie. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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