Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 972043, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/972043
Review Article

Regulation of EPCs: The Gateway to Blood Vessel Formation

1Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology and University of South Australia, Frome Road, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
2School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
3School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
4Centre for Stem Cell Research, Robinson Institute, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia

Received 10 March 2014; Accepted 30 July 2014; Published 22 September 2014

Academic Editor: Keqiang Ye

Copyright © 2014 Kate A. Parham et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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