Table of Contents
Organic Chemistry International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 260726, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/260726
Research Article

Glycerol Containing Triacetylborate Mediated Syntheses of Novel 2-Heterostyryl Benzimidazole Derivatives: A Green Approach

Department of Chemistry, College of Engineering, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh 500 085, India

Received 9 November 2013; Revised 20 February 2014; Accepted 24 March 2014; Published 27 April 2014

Academic Editor: Robert Salomon

Copyright © 2014 Ashok Kumar Taduri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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