Table of Contents
Organic Chemistry International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9589517, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9589517
Research Article

Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Some Quinoline and Oxadiazole Derivatives

1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Maharishi Arvind College of Pharmacy, Ambabari Circle, Jaipur, Rajasthan 302 039, India
2School of Chemical Science, University Sains Malaysia, Penang 118 00, Malaysia
3Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 11323, Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia
4Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, Jharkhand 835 215, India

Received 21 July 2016; Revised 20 October 2016; Accepted 31 October 2016

Academic Editor: Kirpal Bisht

Copyright © 2016 Mohamed Jawed Ahsan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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