Table of Contents
Physiology Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 185767, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/185767
Research Article

Altered Responses to Cold Environment in Urocortin 1 and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Deficient Mice

1Endocrine Division, Department of Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
2Department of Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar

Received 10 December 2012; Revised 10 April 2013; Accepted 23 April 2013

Academic Editor: Sulayman D. Dib-Hajj

Copyright © 2013 Bayan Chaker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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