Table of Contents
Physiology Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 283814, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/283814
Research Article

Changes in Haematological Indices in Normal Pregnancy

1Patychyky Research Consultancy, 16 College Road, Abraka, Nigeria
2Department of Medical Physiology, Delta State University PMB 1, Abraka, Nigeria
3Department of Biochemistry, University of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
4Department of Pharmacology Delta State University PMB 1, Abraka, Nigeria
5Emma-Maria Laboratories and Consultancy, 45 Old Sapele Agbor Road C/O PMB 1, Abraka, Nigeria

Received 15 August 2013; Revised 21 October 2013; Accepted 4 November 2013

Academic Editor: Juan J. Loor

Copyright © 2013 Patrick Chukwuyenum Ichipi-Ifukor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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